Squirrel Breeding Biology - Gestation, Birth & Kitten Development

Female squirrels are polyoestrous, that is they have multiple ovulation cycles each year, and are receptive for only one day during each cycle. Broadly-speaking, the breeding season runs from late December to late August but, as discussed above, this is heavily dependent on weather and food availability. Nonetheless, this translates to young being born as early as mid-February and as late as mid-November. Kittens are born in sturdy a natal drey that is built by the female. Males play no part in raising the young.

A newborn Grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis). - Credit: Audrey

Natal dreys are often difficult for researchers to reach and their construction makes it difficult to inspect their contents without causing damage. Consequently, it is very difficult to collect data on litter size and kitten mortality and much of the following information is based on data from captive animals. Red squirrels produce a litter of, on average, four young (called kittens), following a gestation of between 36 and 42 days – litters of up to seven have been reported.

The kittens are generally between 10g and 18g (half an oz.) at birth, with heavier mothers giving birth to heavier kittens, and the mother will suckle them for 50 to 70 days. Greys typically produce between two and four kittens (eight being the maximum) after at 42 to 45 day gestation – as with Reds, the kittens weigh 14-18g at birth and the female will lactate for about 70 days. I’m not aware of any chemical analyses of Red squirrel milk, but, according to a study by Charles Nixon and Jim Harper on squirrel in Ohio, Grey milk is high in fat (12-25%) and protein (10%), with 3-4% lactose, allowing a rapid growth of the kittens.

A newly-independent Grey squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris), about eight weeks old. - Credit: Philip Jones

Squirrels produce altricial young, which means the kittens are blind, deaf and naked at birth. Skin pigment develops and the first hairs appear on the back after about 14 days, with fur growth complete by about three weeks. The first teeth, the lower incisors, erupt at about three weeks old and the eyes and ears open about a week later. While in the drey, the young will chew twigs to ‘cut’ their teeth and the upper incisors are cut as much as three weeks later than the lower. Females of both species exhibit parental care and are very protective of their young, aggressively defending the drey and readily chasing away any intruders.

The young squirrels start venturing out of the drey at six to seven weeks old, at which point they also begin taking solid food. By 10-12 weeks old the kittens have their first full set of (milk) teeth and are fully weaned. In Grey squirrels, maternal care appears to end once the kittens are weaned, while Red mothers may continue to defend them for up to two weeks post-weaning. As the nursing period progresses, the female will begin spending more and more time away from her offspring so that, at the time of weaning, she may move back to her old dreys, leaving the young together in the breeding drey to fend for themselves. The kittens will moult into their adult coat at around four months old and the milk teeth are lost at between four and eight months old, replaced by the permanent teeth.

If disturbed, the female will move her kittens to an alternative drey. - Credit: Christine Phillips

Red squirrels reach sexually maturity are between nine and 11 months old and, although some American females have been found sexually receptive at six months old, most Greys will not breed until they’re a year old. Fecundity (i.e. number of kittens born) and breeding success (i.e. number of successfully weaned kittens) are highly dependent on habitat quality and resource availability – seemingly more so in deciduous woodlands than in conifer forests. Furthermore, it seems that reproductive rate is inversely related to female abundance, so as the number of females in an area increases, the number of females breeding decreases.